Science Education Supper Series

Skylight's Science Education Supper Series provides a place for faculty members to participate in interactive seminars on teaching and learning issues presented by their colleagues. Meet your peers, enjoy a light meal and refreshments, share your thoughts and hear about the exciting progress our science community is making in learning and teaching.

Organizer:  General inquiries:
Ashley Welsh skylight@science.ubc.ca
ashley.welsh@ubc.ca  

 

 

 

2017-2018 Schedule

 

2017

  • Tuesday, September 26th: 5:00pm – 7:00pm
  • Tuesday, October 24th: 5:00pm – 7:00pm
  • Tuesday, November 21st: 5:00pm – 7:00pm

 

2018

  • Tuesday, January 30th: 5:00pm – 7:00pm
  • Tuesday, February 27th: 5:00pm – 7:00pm
  • Tuesday, March 27th: 5:00pm – 7:00pm

 

Upcoming Seminar

 

Date

Tuesday, September 26th

Presenters

Francis Jones, EOAS

Ashley Welsh, Skylight & CTLT

 

Impact Assessment of Science Education Initiatives: What Strategies Have Worked, and Which Will Support Continued Improvements of Science Education at all Levels?

In the last decade at UBC, there have been a considerable number of small and large-scale teaching and learning innovations within the Faculty of Science, each having had their impacts assessed with a variety of techniques. How then can we leverage these and other strategies to inform a more cohesive approach to science education reform at all levels, from small, local innovations to course-specific, program-wide or department and faculty-level initiatives? In this Supper Series gathering, we will share and reflect upon the challenges, benefits, and opportunities of measuring the impact of our educational reform efforts within and beyond UBC. As a group, we will consider how the outcomes of our projects can support continued improvements in our individual as well as collaborative science education initiatives.

Previous Seminars

Recent curriculum changes in the Department of Chemistry have focused on improving the learning experience in 2nd year synthetic and analytical laboratories. The delivery and assessment of three of our teaching laboratories (analytical and synthetic) have changed dramatically to include active learning elements such as oral reports and guided-inquiry projects. Oral reports allow students to hone-in their oral communication skills while receiving instantaneous feedback on misconceptions about experiments.
Wikipedia is the world’s biggest open education resource, and most of us use it every day. The best way to teach your students to use it wisely is to have them contribute to articles related to their course material. In doing so they’ll learn to evaluate evidence, to write clearly and without bias, and to credit their sources, all while completing work that they’ll be proud to show the world. This workshop will consider various ways to incorporate Wikipedia work into your classes and introduce you to the excellent resources that the Wiki Education Foundation has developed.
Encompassing first year physics, mathematics, biology and chemistry, Science One is a team-taught program that provides a unique educational experience by presenting scientific topics in an integrated format.
What’s an instructor to do when designing her first on-line course which happens to be a MOOC? First, get help. Second, use the same design principles that apply to face-to-face courses. Third, embrace the richness of experience present in the participant group. In this Science Supper Series event, we will discuss design and facilitation choices made and revised over 6 offerings of “Climate Change: The Science”, a free, open, online course offered on UBCx/edX. Fundamental principles of backward design guided the course structure.
We report on our experiences in conducting programming tests on a computer (rather than on paper) in a large, second-year, CPSC course for non-specialists. By adding a suite of in-lab programming tests to our regular assessments, we expected students to improve significantly in these areas: (1) programming ability as measured by final exam grades on programming-related questions, (2) confidence in programming ability, and (3) contributions/effectiveness in pair programming partnerships.
First year physics labs provide a rich environment for developing students' critical thinking. In a multi-year study at the University of British Columbia, we have developed a relatively simple form of scaffolding that dramatically enhances the quality of student reasoning. From the outset, students are asked to make comparisons after completing some measurements, to reflect on the comparison, make a plan based on their reflection, then execute the new plan.
Paired (or co-) teaching is an arrangement in which two faculty are collaboratively responsible for all aspects of teaching a course. Through the Harris extension to CWSEI, paired teaching is being implemented in the departments of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences and Physics and Astronomy in order to leverage the expertise that has been created through the CWSEI to encourage and disseminate the use of research-based instructional strategies.
Evaluation of a peer’s work — and the reflection it can prompt on one’s own thinking — is a valuable activity to support student learning. What if we could imagine a system that could help students judge the quality of their peer's submissions, while also reflecting on their own responses? Using only the input of peers in a cohort, could we produce a ranked list of submissions? And would those judged as "best" by students match those chosen by faculty? We have built a prototype online tool that does exactly this, using an algorithm of adaptive comparative judgment (ACJ).
Have you ever encountered students who believe to “have learned” certain facts, concepts, or skills, but whose course performance suggests otherwise? This exploratory study was conducted in a fourth year biology course precisely to gain insight into students’ own perceptions of what they were learning as well as into the “evidence” that they used to determine that they had learned. I will share the main elements of our methodology, including the frameworks used for our analysis, and our preliminary results.
The adoption of research-based instructional strategies in face to face (f2f) learning environments has recently been gaining momentum. Can the same be said for distance education (DE) courses? During this Supper Series event we will consider the challenges, opportunities and examples of converting successful classroom and lab exercises for asynchronous online learning.
We will present a worksheet-focused approach being used for the introductory Physics courses in the Vantage College science stream. The structure of an individual class is that we start with a brief reading quiz, follow-up with a short mini-lecture, have them spend the majority of class time working in small groups on worksheets and then wrapping up the class with a summarizing mini-lecture that targets common challenges from the day.
SCLT session on the emerging field of learning analytics--its methods and potential.
The Flexible Learning project in chemistry was piloted this fall in CHEM 121. In one section of this large-enrollment first year course, the newly developed online and in-class materials were fully implemented and assigned for course credit, while the online resources remained available for students in all sections to access at their own pace.
The first-year Biology Flexible Learning project (aka BioFlex) is being piloted with BIOL 112 (Biology of the Cell) and BIOL 121 (Genetics, Evolution and Ecology), both large enrolment, multi-section courses. In this presentation we will share some of the things we've explored and learned over the first year of the project, and how the trends are catching on.
Vantage College offers a unique first-year experience that combines credit coursework, academic English instruction, and additional learning and cultural transition opportunities in an 11-month program equivalent to the first year of a UBC degree. In August, we welcomed the first cohort of Vantage College Students. This supper series session will give you an overview of the Vantage College program, with a highlight on our innovative approach to content and language integration.
Efforts have been underway across the Faculty of Science to identify and articulate expected learning outcomes for courses and programs.
A multi-year collaboration between the Faculty of Science and the UBC Writing Centre has led to a collection of diverse science-specific writing resources for our students. The Writing Centre hired science-specific tutors, created a detailed science writing reference document, and gathers information about students who visit. For the classroom, we have developed a series of science-specific writing activities. We will share examples of the pre-, in-, and post-class exercises together with scoring keys and/or rubrics for each activity.
Science One is a rigorous, multidisciplinary first year science program at UBC. Science One presents challenges around team teaching, just‐in‐time teaching, curriculum coordination, siloed thinking and breaking down disciplinary barriers. On the other hand, this is an environment where students self-select and there is a high level of student engagement. Therefore, Science One represents an environment in which innovative teaching is welcome and possible. (Ding!)
Since May of 2010, a concerted effort by the Q4B group has been made to identify fundamental concepts in biology that students often have problems grasping and they often have misconceptions related to this misunderstanding. In this session, we will highlight the progress of this scholarship of teaching and learning work and explore whether what we consider to be biological concepts could also be universal across scientific disciplines.
Our final supper series event for the term will feature Rosie Redfield discussing her MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), Useful Genetics, which recently began a new session through Coursera. From Rosie: "I'll talk about the instructor-side view of a MOOC: Why create one (or not), how to do it, support from UBC, how interactions with students are the same and different, using MOOC material in a UBC class.
The Collaborative Research and Training Experience Atmospheric Aerosols Program (CREATE-AAP) is a multi-component training program designed to develop interdisciplinary competencies in atmospheric aerosol researchers ranging from undergraduate students to postdoctoral fellows.
While exams are typically used for evaluation in post-secondary education, two-stage exams are a simple technique that changes exams into a powerful learning experience. In two-stage exams (aka cooperative exams, group exams, or pyramid exams) students complete a test as individuals and then immediately complete the same, or very similar, test collaboratively in groups of about 4. The students' recent studying and the high stakes environment of the exam create very focused and useful discussions among the groups.
This supper series will explore the development and use of discipline specific attitudinal surveys in the Faulty of Science at UBC. These surveys measure shifts in students’ perceptions of the discipline against a novice-expert-continuum. Since 2006, thousands of Science students in lower and upper level science courses have been surveyed and provided invaluable insights into our understanding of student attitudes and beliefs in their discipline.